EVENTS AND PANELS


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11th Annual Human Rights Awards - John Humphrey Centre for Peace and Human Rights

Free Event   Sun, December 10, 2017   2:00 PM – 5:00 PM MST

Held in commemoration of International Human Rights Day, these awards are meant to recognize those in our community who are actively promoting, fulfilling, protecting or educating on human rights, and making our communities a place where all belong, are included and able to participate.

Every year awards are given out to recipients, who are local human rights champions who are building Edmonton as a human rights city. In 2016, we awarded our first winner from outside of Edmonton in our efforts to recognize Albertans making an impact. This is followed by the Gerald L. Gall Award for an individual who has made an outstanding contribution and has demonstrated excellence in the protection and promotion of human rights in Canada.

This year we will celebrate the 11th annual Human Rights Awards. Robert P. Lee will be our guest speaker for the afternoon.

Robert P. Lee, the recipient the Gerald L. Gall award in 2016, explains what the award means to him, “Right now, there’s a little more failure than success in the work that I do. Because it is so challenging, in a way I feel that I’m not worthy of it yet. I hope to help the people that I’m representing- and I’m not there yet.” The lawyer, also a children's advocate, has represented victims of sexual abuse who he felt were not being treated fairly by the legal system.

Register Here: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/11th-annual-human-rights-awards-tickets-39490176180


JUST ONE WORLD MARKET

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ARAB REVOLUTIONS IN A POST-ISLAMIST TIMES: REVOLUTION WITHOUT REVOLUTIONARIES

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Public Talk by Professor Asef Bayat, Department of Sociology, University of Illinois, USA
Thursday, 1 March 2018, 6:00 PM – 8:00 PM | Room 150, Telus Centre, University of Alberta

On the Seventh anniversary of the Arab Spring, Professor Asef Bayat, a prominent sociologist and a distinguished theorist of social movements in the Middle East, will argue that The revolutionary wave that swept the Middle East in 2011 was marked by spectacular mobilization, spreading within and between countries with extraordinary speed. Several years on, however, it has caused limited shifts in structures of power, leaving much of the old political and social order intact. In his most recent book Revolution without Revolutionaries, Professor Asef Bayat— whose Life as Politics anticipated the Arab Spring— uncovers why this occurred, and what made these uprisings so distinct from those that came before. Setting the 2011 uprisings side by side with the revolutions of the 1970s, particularly the Iranian Revolution, Asef Bayat reveals a profound global shift in the nature of protest: as acceptance of neoliberal policy has spread, radical revolutionary impulses have diminished. Protesters call for reform rather than fundamental transformation. By tracing the contours and illuminating the meaning of the 2011 uprisings, Bayat gives us the what is needed to explain and understand our post–Arab Spring world.

For more information about his recent book, please visit http://www.sup.org/books/title/?id=26257